Faith and Uncle Tut's Outboard Motor

“’If only I can touch his cloak, I shall be cured.’ Jesus turned around and saw her, and said, ‘Courage, daughter! Your faith has saved you.’” (Matthew 9:21-22)

Have you ever noticed how often Jesus said to someone, “your faith has healed [saved] you?” We see it in the above reference to the woman who had been hemorrhaging for 12 years. She pushed through a crowd crushing around Jesus, hoping only to touch his cloak. (Luke 8:43-48)

We see it with Bartimaeus, the blind beggar sitting by the road outside of Jericho, persisting in calling out to Jesus as he passed even though the crowd attempted to silence him. (Mark 10:46-52)  We see it in the friends of a paralytic who went to the extraordinary efforts of taking him upon on a roof and then lowering him down through the tiles in the middle of a crowd in order to get him to Jesus. (Luke 5:18-26)

In each of these instances it was the actions that these people took based upon their faith that brought forth a response from Jesus.   

Faith is incomplete without some kind of action. We need to act on our faith in order for it to have effect. It usually requires that we go out on a limb and risk failure, embarrassment, or disappointment. Here is a small example.

A number of years ago three of my daughters and I were water skiing in Uncle Tut’s boat in the sound between Holden Beach, NC and the mainland when the outboard motor conked out. He tried to start it several times, he fiddled with a number of adjustments, but nothing seemed to work. It was getting late in the day. There were no other boaters in the area. He had no VHS radio, and it was a time before cell phones. We just sat there in the middle of the sound, unable to get back to the landing. I started to silently pray that the motor would start.   Uncle Tut kept pulling at the starter cord, but nothing happened.

I got a sense that I needed to pray out loud so Uncle Tut and my daughters could hear me. As Tut was giving it another pull, I shouted, “Lord Jesus, start the engine!” Varoom, the motor started right up. Uncle Tut, who loved to tell stories, told this story for years – how my prayer started his motor when nothing else could.

Every day we have opportunities to act on our faith. If we see a questionable business practice, our faith in Christ should enable us to speak up for integrity. If a friend is discouraged, our faith should motivate us to provide encouragement. If someone needs to talk, our faith should be willing to listen. If we see a need for healing, our faith should be willing to offer to pray with the person. If we need healing, our faith should be willing to ask others to pray with us.

Are you willing to risk, in order to activate your faith?

8 thoughts on “Faith and Uncle Tut's Outboard Motor

  1. Tom McNichol

    Our Lord is present to us in so many simple ways if we only maintain an awareness and seek his help in time of need. Your uncle Tutt story is it good simple example of this presence.

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  2. Bill Brophy

    Bill, this story is timeless! Your willingness to shout out your prayer never gets old. It is as effective today as it was then.

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  3. Bryan F Trudeau

    Faith is tested when we pray for a healing and it doesn’t come. In my case I have compromised lungs due to inflammation in the lower lung that destroyed 50%. But here’s the thing. I depend on on God even if he does not heal me. I am alive and can breath. I praise him for that. Louis Grams healing gives me hope. His perseverance and attitude inspired me to do my best no matter what
    There is a song by Mercy Me called “even if”. If any one reading this needs a boost in Faith please search this on you tube. You will cry with love for Jesus. Thank you, Bill for your stories. You are loved.

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